Cubs fans celebrate historic championship at Skokie's Village Inn

Emotions ran high when the Cubs won their first World Series championship since 1908 in an epic game seen by a packed house at the Village Inn in Skokie. (Mike Isaacs / Pioneer Press)
Emotions ran high when the Cubs won their first World Series championship since 1908 in an epic game seen by a packed house at the Village Inn in Skokie. (Mike Isaacs / Pioneer Press)

By Mike Isaacs, Skokie Review

No one packed into the Village Inn in downtown Skokie Wednesday night was as old as 108, but they all seemed to have the year 1908 in mind when the moment of a lifetime came.

Cubs third baseman Kris Bryant fielded a slow-rolling ground ball and threw to first baseman Anthony Rizzo for the final out, and then there was bedlam in downtown Skokie’s popular bar.

The Cubs had won the World Series for the first time since 1908.

Hugs, hollers, high-fives and a loud horn created an unhinged celebration – although a few fans had left after the game’s 17-minute rain delay broke up the unrelenting tension of the late innings.

Village Inn owner Randy Miles said business had been “fabulous” since the Cubs began their historic postseason run – up as much as 20 to 25 percent on each game day.

“It’s been stressful for us and a lot of work by the staff, too,” he said. “They’re pretty wiped out now. But it’s been great.”

Miles said the spike in business was on par with when the Bulls and Blackhawks made their respective championship runs. But fans at the Village Inn Wednesday – even younger ones – said they recognize the unique historic significance of the Cubs’ championship above all others.

Some shed tears below television sets displaying the Cubs crowded on the mound in Cleveland and mobbing each other for the last time this season.

Miles had placed a replica mini-scoreboard over the Village Inn entrance on Lincoln Avenue during the entire Cubs’ playoff run. By the time fans left, a sign was perched above the scoreboard declaring the Cubs as World Series champs.

Even leaving the Village Inn more than an hour after the game ended, the celebration could still be heard on the streets of Lincoln Avenue.

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